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Costa Rica Issues New Entry Visa Guidelines Based on Nationality

Article Summary:

The General Migration and Foreign Affairs Office issued new regulations and guidelines for entry visas into Costa Rica. Citizens from various countries are now divided into four groups which may or may not require a visa to enter into the country and each category has a new allotted amount of time to stay.

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Original Article Text From Lexincorp via Google Translate:

Costa Rica: General Migration and Foreign Affairs Office issues new entry visa regulations for non residents

On May, 9th, the new Entry Visa Regulations for Non Residents were published in the official newspaper La Gaceta, in which countries are distributed into four groups according to which their citizens might require a visa to enter Costa Rica and the period they are allowed to stay is determined.

According to this, the natives of the first group countries do not require a visa and can remain for up to 90 non-extendable calendar days, such as the citizens of Germany and United States. Natives of the second group of countries do not require a visa either but they can stay in the country for only 30 calendar days, which can be extended to 90 days upon filing a request before the General Migration and Foreign Affairs Office. This is the case for Guatemala and Venezuela.

The citizens of the third group, such as Nicaraguans and Colombians, need to have a consular visa when entering Costa Rica and they can remain for 30 calendar days, which can be extended to 90 days as well. The regulations establish exceptions in the case of travelers with a Schengen, US, Canada or UE visa, among others.

Finally, aliens coming from the fourth group countries need to have a restricted visa, which is granted by the Restricted Visa Committee and will be allowed to stay for 30 extendable, calendar days. This is the case for countries such as Cuba and China, although the last one has certain exceptions due to the recent diplomatic and commercial agreements between this country and Costa Rica.

Unlike the previous dispositions regarding entry visas, these regulations also clarify the validity that passports need to have when entering Costa Rica depending on the origin country of its bearer. It also explains the documents that travelers need to carry with them such as a ticket out Costa Rica or a flight plan, as well as proof of having sufficient economical means in the amount of at least $100 for each month they will stay.

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From Lexincorp

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