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Beatings, Suffocation With Plastic Bags, Electric Shocks, And Drowning. All is Fare When Dealing With the Accused.

Article Summary:

Beatings, suffocation with plastic bags and drowning, electric shocks and death threats are common practices used regularly by Mexican security forces against persons accused of committing a crime, indicates World Report 2012 Human Rights Watch.

Original Article Text From Mexico CNN via Google Translate :

In Mexico there is impunity for torture, says Human Rights Watch

The beatings, suffocation with plastic bags and drowning, electric shocks and death threats are common practices used regularly by Mexican security forces against persons accused of committing a crime, indicates World Report 2012 Human Rights Watch (HRW), released Sunday.

“Torture remains a serious problem and in general these events occur in the period that the victims are arbitrarily detained until they are made available to prosecutors” detailed in his report, the organization dedicated to defending human rights.

This practice has been perpetuated in Mexico because the judges accept confessions extracted under torture or ill-treatment, because the authorities do not require medical checkups to assess the physical and psychological state of victims and because most cases of torture are not investigated, says HRW, which devotes six of the 73 pages of its report to the country.

However, the body recognizes as a positive aspect of constitutional reform establishing oral proceedings, which will promote “a greater respect for basic rights,” as the presumption of innocence.

In 2008, the Mexican Congress approved a number of judicial reforms to adapt the oral proceedings to the administration of justice in the country, but few states have implemented this method. 

The reform aims to move from an inquisitorial system of justice based on written records in an adversarial oral and public trials which confront the authority and counsel to expedite legal proceedings, no later than 2016.
“The army is not ready”

The Human Rights Watch report also criticizes the military’s involvement in the National Security Strategy, implemented by the government of Felipe Calderon in December 2006 to combat organized crime.

The military “have committed gross human rights violations, including executions, torture and forced disappearances.”

In presenting the report in Cairo Egypt, the communications director of the organization, Emma Daly, said the Mexican Armed Forces are not well trained to fight organized crime and go unpunished when committed abuses, according to a report of the EFE.

“We have evidence that violence has increased in Mexico hideously in recent years and that there is a system for the military judge so that there is justice,” news agency quoted.

Between 2007 and 2011 the Attorney General of Military Justice began investigations against 3.600 soldiers, but only 15 have been convicted in that period, according to the report.

In July last year, the Supreme Court’s Office approved restrictions on military jurisdiction to members of the military implicated in human rights violations could be tried in civilian courts.

More murders
In Mexico there has been “an alarming increase in the number of homicides” by the disputes between criminals, says HRW’s report, without giving figures.

The National Security Strategy has contributed to “worsen the climate of chaos and fear that is prevalent in many regions of the country,” according to the organization.

Between December 2006 and September 2011, 47.515 people have died from incidents related to criminal rivalry , according to figures provided by the Attorney General’s Office (PGR).

Both offenders and members of the security forces deliberately attacked journalists, human rights defenders and migrants, HRW said in the report.

Link to Original Article:

From Mexico CNN

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