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Where The New York Times Says You Should Go (But Don’t)

Article Summary:

New York Times Travel lists its top 46 destinations for 2013, choosing both Nicaragua and Mexico. Why Nicaragua? If its booming eco-lodge business is any indication, Nicaragua’s moment might finally have arrived. While Mexico’s Yucatan ranked 36 for its planned celebrations of the Mayan calendar that include concerts, dance rituals, literary festivals and talks by renowned astronomers.

Photo Credit: New York Times

Original Article Text From New York Times:

The 46 Places to Go in 2013

Whether you travel to eat or shop, surf or ski, new adventures await. Click here for the complete list.

3. Nicargaua
If the name Oliver North means anything to you, there’s a good chance that Nicaragua doesn’t jump to your mind when you think of a relaxing, high-end, spa-filled vacation. For the past 30 years, the country has been fighting its image as a land of guerrilla warfare and covert arms deals. At first, only travel writers took note; over the past several years, various publications have declared the country the next great destination. However, if the booming eco-lodge business is any indication, Nicaragua’s moment might finally have arrived. In and around the coastal towns of San Juan del Sur and Maderas, new lodges like the Aqua Wellness Resort, the high-end (and soon-to-open) Mukul Resort and Jicaro Island Eco-Lodge are cropping up near old-time eco-lodges, like Morgan’s Rock Hacienda and Eco-Lodge. The food scene is getting a high-end makeover as well, with top chefs opening restaurants. The most exciting ones — El Segundo, La Casserole, Ciudad Lounge and La Finca y El Mar — are proof that Nicaragua is becoming an impressive food destination in its own right. — Danielle Pergament

36. Yucatan, Mexico
Inscriptions in the ancient Mayan calendar pointed to Dec. 21, 2012, as an ending. While a few alarmists read this as a sign of the apocalypse, many scholars interpreted it as symbolizing a new era. In strongholds of Mayan culture like the Yucatán Peninsula, home to Chichen Itza, Uxmal and other archaeological sites, the second view is the one with traction: officials there have planned a series of celebrations through March that include concerts, dance rituals, literary festivals and talks by renowned astronomers. The cultural immersion is spilling over onto the area’s resorts. One of them, Hotel Esencia, a seaside lodging with 29 thatched palapas and an organic spa, is offering a three-day cleansing ritual called Kukulkan, where trained healers concoct personalized herbal baths. A quieter look at Mayan heritage is on hand at the new Museo Maya in Cancún, which has more than 300 relics and 10,000-year-old human remains from its permanent collection on display. — Paola Singer

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From New York Times

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